THE FUTURE OF PHOTOGRAPHY AND UNSPLASH

  ©Unsplash

©Unsplash

Unsplash did not start to reinvent an industry. Unsplash had started because Mikael Cho and his friends thought it might be useful. Unsplash is a community where anyone can share high-resolution photos for anyone to use freely. It began as a Tumblr blog with ten leftover photos from a photoshoot. Instead of letting those sit dead in a hard drive, they decided it would be better if they were put to use to move other creative projects forward. "We believed the good from giving our images away would far outweigh what we could earn if we required payment or credit" says Cho about why he started Unsplash.

In the last ten years, several platforms like YouTube, iPhone, Twitter, Instagram, SoundCloud, and Medium have enabled us to express our creative soul and connect with one another. A team of researchers found the most shared articles from the New York Times were ones that gave readers practical utility. Giving someone something useful tends to have the biggest impact on people. When you pair two powerful things, for example giving and photography, you reach a whole new level of impact.

Every industry evolves. Things will change. We cannot be resistant to change no matter how much today’s world benefits us. We face the same fact that every artist and business must face: what we offer today will eventually be obsolete. We can choose to be upset with this fact or understand it is inevitable and continue to adapt. More so, if you do it right, you will be the one to disrupt the industry. You will land at the front of the pack. You will help determine the new value. "That is what we’re looking to do for photography. That’s what we’re looking to do for the creative community," Cho writes on his Medium blog, and adds "we are all in the same boat. When the creative industry benefits, we all benefit."