AMAZON OWNS A WHOLE COLLECTION OF SECRET BRANDS

  ©Sean Gallup (Getty Images)

©Sean Gallup (Getty Images)

After decades of selling products and collecting data about what people are buying, and when they are buying it, Amazon has started cutting out the middle-man by selling self-produced items. Through its AmazonBasics house brand, it sells various types of small items, from iPhone chargers to batteries, and foam rollers to washcloths. It is the sort of stuff that customers might not be too brand loyal over. Whilst Amazon-branded products are obviously recognisable, the company has started to sell products, using a different sub-brands that do not make it clear that they are Amazon-made products.

When Amazon sees that a product is selling well, it may decide to work with manufacturers to make the product itself. It makes sense to apply the Amazon name, which its clients might associate with reliability or technology to generic batteries, headphones, or office accessories. However, there are limits to the Amazon brand that the company would be wise not to cross, as a brand name can only stretch so far. “Can you imagine anyone ever saying, ‘oh lord this Amazon personal lubricant is just so sexy,'” says Mark DiMassimo, CEO of advertising agency DiMassimo Goldstein.

Amazon is relentless in its pursuit of growth. They are buying more jets to ship packages around the world and trying to figure out how to completely own the supply chain and automate deliveries by setting up shops near people's home or even drop boxes in residential buildings. With Amazon Echo, Jeff Bezos' empire has already installed millions of voice-operated machines in people's homes so that all someone has to do is speak and by utilising Amazon PrimeAir autonomous drones Amazon products will arrive with half an hour.

It has gotten to the point where it is quite easy to pay Amazon three times in one order: for shipping, a Prime membership and for a product that is actually made by Amazon. With that being said, it does not seem to be that wrong to imagine a time when your clothes, your food, your TV shows, your gadgets and your furniture are all made and sold by the same company: Amazon.