A BUSINESS LEADER’S GUIDE TO AGILE

  ©KPMG

©KPMG

Agile development has become popular in conjunction with digitization. It entails frequent interactions between business and IT groups, and it requires widespread acceptance of a test-and-learn approach. Agile work flows create positive business outcomes, such as a more engaging customer experience, streamlined internal processes, and a thriving, collaborative corporate culture. My team and I at Alchemist have been adopting an agile work flow from the start. In turn, this outcome-driven approach greatly enhanced our progress, work environment and culture. 

In an agile company there are no order givers or takers, no “us versus them” dynamic between the business units and the IT organization. There is just one team, building innovative software that transforms the work of those who use it and enables ever-closer connections to customers and business partners. Agile cannot be a priority solely for technology organizations, but must be on everyone's agenda today. 

Companies and their respective business leaders have realized that they cannot take full advantage of digital tools and technologies without having new, amped-up processes for managing them. Agile promises rapidly evolving software and substantial business benefits, but it requires new habits from both sides: from IT and from business partners. Digital McKinsey has created a list of six habits that help to create an agile environment.